Posts Tagged 'sight words'

Reading Fluency, Are they ready?

Ask these questions before you begin working on reading fluency.

  1. Can they recognize the letters of the alphabet and know the sounds of the consonants and short vowels?
  2. Can they put together common 3 letter words that use short vowel sounds?
  3. Do they know that words in sentences are read from left to right?
  4. Are they able to read 9 out of every 10 words of the first pre-primers you are using?

What do I do if they aren’t ready?

  Check out the other posts on Steps 1, 2,3 of beginning to read.

Reading Fluency, even further

 Now that you have begun to get reading and are starting to move beyond the simple words, it is time to move to the next level.  This would be books at the first grade level and above.

Begin by teaching the consonant blends. Sl, ch, th, wh, pl, bl,  etc.

  1. Work to create words using these consonant blends. 
  2. Do not teach more than 3-5 at a time until they are all learned.  A good complete list is located at www.firstschoolyears.com/literacy/word/phonics/clusters/clusters.htm . I have a short list below.
  3. Be sure to point these out in reading by having them look for them before reading a page.

 

Reading Time steps: 

  1. They read 1 page.
  2. They talk about what they read.
  3. If they are not reading fluently with expression, then you read, otherwise, they  read again.
  4. If you read, then they read again after you.

Remember that you are only doing 2-3 pages a day now.

 

Important notes:

  1. Don’t forget, you still do not allow them to guess.
  2. If sight word, give them to count of 3 in head to get it, then tell them.
  3. If a word that is to be sounded out, prompt them with, “What is the first sound?” before telling them the word by slowly sounding it out for them. Still do not allow them to guess.

 

Older kids

  •  Only work on this for no more than a ½ hour per day.
  • Focus on you reading to them or them listening to audio books for their basic academics. 
  • The reading will get there, and they need to practice reading skills at the lower level to build fluency. 
  • Discuss this with them and have them help choose those lower level books so that they are interested.

 

Sounds to teach and order-

Consonant Digraphs- ch, sh, wh, th, ph

 

Consonant blends- bl, cl, fl, pl, sl, spl, sc, sk, sm, st, str, sw, tw, br,dr,gr,cr,fr, tr, spr

 

Introducing Syllables

To teach them to break words into syllables to read them more easily try:

  • Placing hand under chin and feeling it move up and down and count syllables with words they are learning.
  • Write words for them to read that are separated into syllables.                            air  plane    turbo tax  care ful

 Use your library and the leveled readers section.

If you can, choose a series from the library and stick with it.  They each vary a little in how they level them and moving back and forth through them can feel strange.

 

 

 

 

Step 3 Teaching the Sight Words

Sight words

Each day, you will want to work on sight words.  There is a list of 220 sight words that was developed by Edward Dolch that are used the most in the English Language.  These words are sight words and are not meant to be sounded out.  There are other words that should be sight words besides those 220, but these are the most common used in our English language.  You can purchase a set of these to put on flashcards, or create cards yourself.  You can also find powerpoints online that are created using these words.  Some have sound and will say the word and will only give them 3 seconds to say it before the powerpoint says it.  My favorite resource for these online is Mrs. Perkins website online.  She has a variety of available activities for use on the dolch sight words that include the powerpoints.http://www.mrsperkins.com/dolch-audio.html

When working with flashcards or powerpoints for learning the sight words, it is important to only give a slow count to 3 for your child to recognize and say the word.  If they don’t then you say it for them.  You want to learn what these words are, because later when reading, you will want to do the same thing when they see the word in text.  You will not want them trying to sound these words out. 

To learn these sight words, start with 3 to five words depending on your child’s pacing needs.  Show them the word, say the word.  Place the word on the table in front of them. Say the word and have them repeat you. After giving a second word, have them pick up the first word, say what it is and lay it down.  If they do not recall within 3 seconds say it for them and have them repeat it before setting the word down.  Give a third word, have them repeat it.  Go back to the first word, have them pick it up, say the word and place it down.  Do this until you get to about 5 words on the first day.  Then work with those five, mixing them up and repeating the activity of picking each word up and saying what it is and placing it down. Repeat this, having them try to remember it the next time.  Mix the cards up each time and add words each day at a pacing that fits them.   Normally you can add 3 to 5 words each day.  You will want to go over all of the words, but once you have had a few days of adding words, you will pick 5 old words and 3-5 new words to use for practice each day. 

One activity I like and comes from, “How to Teach your Dyslexic Child to Read” but I have adapted to include other ideas is to play a word game.  To play the game:

1. Take about 10 of the words.

2. Place them facing up where you can see the words

3. Use a toy car, little people or other fun moveable object.  Each of you has one.

4.  Place your object in front of you on the edge of the table of words. 

5. Each of you take turns saying a word or you say all the words. 

6. After saying the, you both race to the word.  You should hesitate to allow them to win most of the cards.

You can search in any search engine to find the 220 sight words, but using the link above gets you several lists in building order. Teach them in that order for great success.  Once certain words are learned put them in a stack together to be reviewed as needed.  Start with the first list “pre-primer list” and work your way up.   

What can I do to help my child read faster? submitted by K Weeks

Top six things to improve your child’s reading speed.

1.  Read to them everyday.

2.  When reading with them try echo reading: You read the sentence and then they reads the same sentence pointing to each word. 

3.  Try choral reading having them and a sibling read text together outloud with you reading it too.   All three of you reading together. Text to build speed needs to be text that they can read 90% of the words accurately the first time.

3.  Try thinking aloud.  When reading, say what someone would think when they are reading a word they haven’t read before.  You know how to read words, but you know for them that there are words that they hit and say, oh goodness, that is a big word.  If you were reading, The cat is swinging in the tree.  You can can think aloud as you read.  Be sure to tell the kids you are going to think aloud because else wise they might just interrupt to tell you the word.  It is done like this. 

 “The cat is…hmm.. /s/../w/, the letters ing say /ing/ so I have /s/, /w/, ing… swing, the letters ing again, it’s swinging.  The cat is swinging in the …tr says the  /tr/ sound and ee…tree.  The cat is swinging in the tree.” 

 This models the thought process someone that is trying to read something difficult for them.  This is a process we naturally, as fluent readers do on hard words, but we don’t say it outloud.  Some kids need to be taught this process.  Within that you end up teaching him sound combinations that he may not know at this point like that ing makes the /ing/ sound and tr makes the /tr/ sound.  It is best done by watching for those sounds he most says incorrectly and then modeling it with those sounds. Put those sounds in a powerpoint or on flashcards and practice them.  Model the think aloud when you see that sound. 

 4.  Create flashcards or powerpoints with the common letter combinations for specific sounds or common words they are not reading with quick recognition.  Once they begin to recognize and state the word within a second, you will want to build automaticity by flashing the card for less than a second and make it disappear.  This is the point they then sate the word.  They think about it after the words has disappeared.  They can’t sound it out.  

5.  Read, read and re-read poetry, things with rhythm and/ or rhyme, repeatedly.

6.  Reader’s Theater- reading their part that is on their level repeatedly.

Please email me questions/comments.  I will be glad to consult with you to help you in regards to your child’s needs.

   

 


Lynnette Crawley M.S. Ed

As an educational consultant, I work with families, students, adults, parents, teachers, schools and corporations in relationship to the many disabilities affecting their lives. Many times all anyone needs is a little coaching, direction or tools to close the gap between where they are and where they should be. Making progress is not good enough. We must be closing the gap. Email: everyonecanlearn@ymail.com

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